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Professional Athlete’s
Blog

Professional athletes have unique financial planning needs due to the amount and timing of their earning careers. Athletes with their families should create a financial plan spanning their playing career, transition post playing career and their long term life goals.

Information for educational purposes only.

Cutting Weight

Over the years I’ve learned a couple of useful facts about cutting weight. Once the food you eat leaves the stomach, it passes into the large and small intestine, which are approximately 25 feet long. Generally, it takes steak three days, chicken two days and fish one day to travel through our gastrointestinal tract (GI). Take those time frames into consideration as you get closer to competition day. Since your intestines are a membrane, proper hydration is necessary. Be sure to drink plenty of water and get in some pool or tub time.

I blend half of my favorite cereal along with Fiber One Cereal, Original Bran. It makes a great late-night snack instead of a midnight burger run. Also, consider cutting out fiber the night before a competition.

Intestinal health appears to be important to one’s overall health, resistance to disease and response to treatment. Recently, I read a study stating that cancer patients with good gut bacteria were more receptive to immunotherapy treatments.

The GI-Tract

Our Top Secret Pancake Recipe

Put out a challenge for any mix combinations that are better than our top secret recipe (okay probably not as secret now).

1. Robby’s Pancake mix from William Sonoma. And yes, you have to use buttermilk and not milk.

2. See’s Candies Semi-Sweet Chocolate Chips.

3. Ripe bananas pureed and then blended with the pancake mix.

On Efficiency

“The organization will let you work on whatever you want to work on. You just have to make sure you are working on things only you can work on… Certainly true if you are going through a period of tremendous scrutiny or big changes… You have to set time aside to make sure you know where you are.” Qualcomm CEO Steve Mollenkopf, minute 22.

Mr. Mollenkopk’s words had a big impact on me as an entrepreneur as there are no shortage of items that need attention. His comments bring clarity to how to prioritize tasks to determine what needs should be delegated versus owned. End goal is efficiency as to avoid burnout as one scales mountains.

Case Study: Group Flow

Louis Gerstner wrote a fascinating book about his turnaround of IBM in the 90’s. One lesson I took away from Who Says Elephants Can’t Dance (available on Audible.com) was that Gerstner made no decisions initially, but rather spent time talking with his different divisions. His approach relates to author Steven Kotler’s statement about what Google was seeking in a CEO: “to let go of his ego, merge with the team…” Only when Gerstner had a clear idea of IBM’s needs across the organization, did he then proceed to right the ship.

Stealing Fire by Steven Kotler and Jamie Wheal is available on Audible.com.

Finite verus Infinite Game

“They also make the very clever shift away from seeing those in their industry as competitors and rather see them as rivals. A competitor is someone you want to beat. And the obsession again is too much on the finite. What are the metrics, how are we going to get ahead of them? A rival is someone who’s strengths reveals to you your weaknesses. So to see those in your industry and admire where they are better than you, instead of trying to beat them, you look at where your weaknesses are, and improve. It’s constant improvement.” -Simon Sinek

Finite and Infinite Games by James Carse is a very interesting book and available on Audible. The Infinite Game by Simon Sinek is scheduled to be released June 6, 2019. Can’t wait!

On Wine

Wine is a strong acidic beverage with a pH between 3 and 4. A great book on wine is The Billionaire’s Vinegar by Benjamin Wallace which is available on Audible.com.

Traits of Billionaires include GRIT and Resilience

Success demands not believing the hype, or lack thereof, tunnel vision, GRIT and resilience. Each level becomes ever the more challenging but the formula remains the same: Just do the work.

Just downloaded Barking Up The Wrong Tree by Eric Barker on Audible.com.

Alkaline versus Acidic Foods

A recent conversation with a friend about acid reflux brought up a 2004 email from my father. Below content from his email is the framework in which I think about the food I eat. While the average pH value of yogurt is about 4, which is somewhat acidic, a drinkable yogurt from Trader Joe’s always settles my stomach.

“Strong alkaline food: Grape, tea, Seaweed.

Medium alkaline food: Yellow bean, tomato, pumpkin, strawberry, lemon,
spinach, banana, & egg white.

Weak alkaline food: Red bean, apple, onion, tofu, green color
vegetable.

Strong acidic food: Egg (yellow portion), cheese, persimmon.

Medium acidic food: Bacon, pork, beef, margarine, bread, wheat,
chicken & fish.

Weak acidic food: Rice, peanut, beer, clam, oil fries.

85% of cancer patients have acidic body fluid (pH< 7.4). Best acidic foods: alkaline foods ratio is 1:3”